Monthly Archives: July 2012

How Much Can You Drink and Avoid DUI Arrest and DUI Classes ?

Avoid a DUI and DUI classes – Use the Blood Alcohol Calculator at Tom Wilson Counseling.

You don’t have to be drunk to be an impaired driver or get a DUI.

Frequently, a DUI arrest can results in fines, DUI classes and a restricted license.

Learn how much is too much with this online blood alcohol calculator courtesy of  Tom Wilson Counseling Center, a developer of online dui classes.

Rowdy Football Fans Required to take Anger Management Class Online

Rowdy Football Fans Required to Take Anger Management Class Online

 Here’s a story published by by First Coast News:

“JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The Jacksonville Jaguars are looking at joining several other NFL teams and requiring an online anger management course for fans ejected for bad behavior.

When the Jaguars kick off on Sunday afternoon, you can count on Linda Riggs being in the crowd. Riggs has been to more than 170 games and is currently the president of the Jacksonville Jaguars booster club. She’s seen her share of bad behavior.

They literally get in fights, and the language. I don’t understand why people have to get so out of sorts with a game,” said Riggs. “It really irritates me when I pay good money to see that game without all that. Most of the problems are alcohol-related, with the drinking getting out of hand.”

Sharon Sturges loves Jaguars football. “There’s no place I’d rather be on a football afternoon than at the stadium seeing the Jaguars,” she said.

As an eight-year season ticket holder, Sturges has seen her share of rowdy fans.

“Two people will be arguing, all of a sudden a couple more join in and pretty soon another is added, somebody from three rows up dives in and it’s a melee. It’s unbelievable people act that way.”

The Jaguars said that on average, about a dozen fans a game are ejected. They are looking at joining other teams in the league that require an online anger management course developed for the league. The course educates the fan on alcohol awareness, how disruptive behavior effects other fans and teaches them coping skills to act more appropriate at the stadium.

Currently eight teams are participating, including the Green Bay Packers, New York Giants, New England Patriots and Indianapolis Colts. Some require the course before being allowed back in to another game. In some cases, if fans don’t take the course and are ejected again, then they face loss of their season tickets.

“Something needs to be done,” said Sturges. “I think maybe they need a little support, maybe direction on how to be adults and how to have a good time without being drunk.”

Riggs added, “They’ve just got to learn you can’t control the world. It doesn’t work they way you want it to.”

Four-year season ticket holder Ron Johnson says he’s all for it.

“If you’ve got fans that just come there to cause problems, get disruptive to a point you can’t even enjoy, or your safety is a concern, yeah I definitely agree with that move by the NFL,” said Johnson outside a Jacksonville Suns game he was attending.

The Jaguars are formulating their policy and it’s enforcement and penalties according to the team. Dan Edwards of the Jaguars says that varies from team to team. ”

Anger Management Class

Drinking and Aggression Among University Students
Aggression and violence among university students often involve alcohol consumption. A new study has found that both drinking levels and drinking contexts are important. Aggression is more likely when students drink at a fraternity, sorority or campus residence, and when a partner is present. Attending parties also increases the risk of aggression, especially for women. A significant proportion of university students experience violence, under circumstances that often involve alcohol. 
“A number of studies have shown that university students experience a wide range of harms related to alcohol consumption, including aggression,” said Samantha Wells, a scientist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and corresponding author for the study. 
Aggression among university students likely reflects aggression in society, said Tim Stockwell, professor and director of the Centre forBehaviorAddictions Research of B.C. at the University of Victoria.  “I would not expect students to have lower or higher levels,” he said.  “Aggression and violence are features of group drinking situations, in general, especially where these involve groups of young men who are strangers to each other and are in competition in various ways.”
To better understand what may increase risk of aggression among students, Wells and her colleagues used data collected through the 2004 Canadian Campus Survey, a national survey of 6,282 students at 40 universities.  Responses from 4,387 (64.3% female, 35.7% percent male) respondents were analyzed, focusing on the students three most recent drinking events.
“We found that that the more drinks students consumed, the greater their likelihood of experiencing aggression,” said Wells.  “We also found that aggression was more likely when students drank at a fraternity, sorority or residence, when their partner was present, andBehaviorwhen they drank at three or more places on the same occasion.  Drinking at a party also increased the likelihood of aggression, especially women.  Conversely, aggression was less likely when students had a meal.”
Given that the researchers controlled the alcohol intake as well as living arrangements, Wells said there is something about fraternities, sororities and campus residences that is particularly risky for students.  “We need to understand what it is about these settings that make them particularly risky for aggression,” she said.  “Is it, for example, that large parties, such as keg parties, are held in these settings?  Is it that drinking in these settings involves heightened concerns with masculinity?”
Wells added that the finding of greater aggression among women than men at parties was consistent with previous research showing that women tend to report aggression with people they know and at home, whereas men are more likely to report aggression with strangers in public places.  “Prevention programs that focus on preparing women for the risks associated with drinking at parties might help to reduce their likelihood of experiencing aggression,” she said.  “However, more research would be useful to determine, for example, who women are fighting with and whether they are victims, mutual participants, or perpetrators.” Both Wells and Stockwell suggested that findings from this study can be used for policy and prevention purposes.
Behavior“The risk of alcohol-related violence is usually associated with a combination of intoxication and certain predictable social situations,” said Stockwell, “mostly involving a degree of conflict or frustration.  When people are intoxicated, they are less able or inclined to resolve these situations peaceably.  Measures to reduce the risk of aggression and violence need to address not only reducing conflict and stress in drinking situations but also moderating the amount people actually drink.  Both the amount people drink and the drinking context – for example, the size of the drinking group, type of drinking setting, whether or not a partner is present – increased risk of alcohol-related aggression and violence.” Wells agreed.  “The present research clearly identifies an important role of alcohol in aggression,” she said, “therefore prevention programs need to focus on reducing excessive drinking among college students.  We found that drinking with a partner actually increased the likelihood of aggression.  This may reflect that aggression occurs between partners or that incidents of aggression arise due to jealousy concerns, similar to research on aggression in bars.  Therefore, programs that focus on preventing partner violence and other relationship-related conflicts may be highly effective.  In addition, programs that promote the consumption of food, and encourage people to stay in one place rather than going from one drinking place to another, may likewise reduce the occurrence of alcohol-related aggression.”
Click on links below for more information or to begin registration.
ALL classes developed and monitored by Tom Wilson, a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor who is also a Certified Alcohol and Substance Prevention Specialist. Tom is the author of “Taming Anger and Aggression“, an anger management program which has been taught to hundreds of people at the counseling center over the last twelve years. He specializes in adapting evidence-based substance abuse prevention programs for delivery through the web and other electronic media.

Anger Management: Actor Popular on FX

American cable viewers love them some Charlie Sheen. America really, really loves Charlie Sheen in his role teaching  Anger Mangement. They love Charlie Sheen the way Kardashians hate shame.

According to E! Online, critics gave the ex-“Two and a Half Men” star’s new FX comedy “Anger Management” – based loosely on the Adam Sandler-Jack Nicholson comedy of the same name – a good, handy drubbing. Then again, critics – for what do we even really need you? Viewers make or break shows in the end, not good or bad reviews, and the recent premiere on FX set new network records that might guarantee the show a ludicrous extended order.

Sean Penn Completes Anger Management Classes

Sean Penn Completes Anger Management Classes Ordered by the Court

Actor-director Sean Penn has successfully completed the anger management classes he was ordered to take following a showdown with a photographer in 2009.

The 51-year-old pleaded no contest to vandalism after clashing with a paparazzo and as a result a charge of battery was dismissed – but in addition to probation, Penn was ordered to attend 36 hours of anger management classes. He was given top marks for his progress during a hearing in January and Penn has now completed the course, his lawyer told a court on Friday, reported TMZ Online.

However, Penn will remain on probation until next May.

Anger Management Counseling Ordered for Knocking out Victim’s Tooth

Anger Management Counseling Ordered for Knocking out Victim’s Tooth 
A man who Naperville police said knocked out a teenager’s tooth during an attempted robbery last summer has been ordered to undergo anger management counseling as part of his sentence in that case.
Michael D. Wisch, 18, must also write letters of apology to the two youths he accosted during that incident and have no further contact with them, according to records on file in DuPage County Circuit Court in Wheaton.
Wisch lives on the 600 block of Clover Court, in an unincorporated area of DuPage County near west-central Naperville. He was originally charged with aggravated battery causing great bodily harm, a felony.
He pleaded guilty to a reduced, misdemeanor charge of battery causing bodily harm. Three companion charges of attempted robbery, aggravated battery in a public place and mob action were dismissed in exchange for his plea, court records showed.
The case against Wisch was originally continued from June 12 to Wednesday. Records indicated he instead pleaded guilty and was sentenced on July 16.
Judge Daniel P. Guerin that day ordered the anger management counseling and instructed Wisch to write the letters and stay away from the victims, according to records. Guerin also sentenced Wisch to three days in DuPage County Jail, time he has already served since being arrested, records showed.

Teen Alcohol Use in California

Study shows teen drinking highest in Laguna and Santa Ana

Excerpt from The Orange County Register article by Courtney Perkes presents a study about the high percentages of teens that experiment with alcohol compared to their peers in other counties and cities in California.

Orange County is an overall healthy place to live, but a new report examining everything from teen drinking rates to park space shows that some cities are faring significantly worse.

For instance, Orange County teens experiment less with alcohol than their peers statewide. But students living in Laguna Beach and Santa Ana exceed the state average by 7 percentage points.

TEEN DRINKING

In most segments, the less affluent and less educated parts of the county fared the worst for health indicators, such as adults with health insurance and access to healthy food. An exception is smoking and drinking rates among teens.

Teen drinkers, the report says, are at greater risk of alcoholism as adults, as well as academic struggles, risky sexual behavior and drug use.

Locally, 41 percent of ninth-graders reported having tried alcohol. Irvine Unified was the lowest at 25 percent.

The state average is 47 percent. Three school districts exceeded that rate: Laguna Beach Unified and Santa Ana Unified, both at 54 percent, and Newport-Mesa at 50 percent.

Pamela Estes, executive director of the Laguna Beach Boys & Girls Club, is part of a coalition working to reduce the problem.

“It’s the age and it crosses every socioeconomic strata,” Estes said. “You’ve got teens who have a lot of time and resources on their hands here. They pretty much are left to their own devices.”

Estes said the coalition is working on ways to educate parents about the problem. She said her club invites guest speakers to share with teens their struggles with addiction.

Laguna Beach also has the highest concentration of businesses selling alcohol in the county, according to the report. Laguna Woods has the lowest.

“Everyone thinks stop them from selling to kids,” Estes said. “That’s not where they get it. It’s from the home.”

(Source:  http://www.ocregister.com/articles/county-365327-percent-laguna.html)

Click on class below to begin registration:

4 Hour Online Minor in Possession Class: $75



NEW!
OTHER ONLINE CLASSES at Tom Wilson Counseling Center:








ALL classes developed and monitored by Tom Wilson, a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor who is also a Certified Alcohol and Substance Prevention Specialist.

teens

Minor in Possession California

Study shows teen drinking highest in Laguna and Santa Ana

Excerpt from The Orange County Register article by Courtney Perkes presents a study about the high percentages of teens that experiment with alcohol compared to their peers in other counties and cities in California.

Orange County is an overall healthy place to live, but a new report examining everything from teen drinking rates to park space shows that some cities are faring significantly worse.

For instance, Orange County teens experiment less with alcohol than their peers statewide. But students living in Laguna Beach and Santa Ana exceed the state average by 7 percentage points.

TEEN DRINKING

In most segments, the less affluent and less educated parts of the county fared the worst for health indicators, such as adults with health insurance and access to healthy food. An exception is smoking and drinking rates among teens.

Teen drinkers, the report says, are at greater risk of alcoholism as adults, as well as academic struggles, risky sexual behavior and drug use.

Locally, 41 percent of ninth-graders reported having tried alcohol. Irvine Unified was the lowest at 25 percent.

The state average is 47 percent. Three school districts exceeded that rate: Laguna Beach Unified and Santa Ana Unified, both at 54 percent, and Newport-Mesa at 50 percent.

Pamela Estes, executive director of the Laguna Beach Boys & Girls Club, is part of a coalition working to reduce the problem.

“It’s the age and it crosses every socioeconomic strata,” Estes said. “You’ve got teens who have a lot of time and resources on their hands here. They pretty much are left to their own devices.”

Estes said the coalition is working on ways to educate parents about the problem. She said her club invites guest speakers to share with teens their struggles with addiction.

Laguna Beach also has the highest concentration of businesses selling alcohol in the county, according to the report. Laguna Woods has the lowest.

“Everyone thinks stop them from selling to kids,” Estes said. “That’s not where they get it. It’s from the home.”

(Source:  http://www.ocregister.com/articles/county-365327-percent-laguna.html)

Click on class below to begin registration:

4 Hour Online Minor in Possession Class: $75



NEW!
OTHER ONLINE CLASSES at Tom Wilson Counseling Center:








ALL classes developed and monitored by Tom Wilson, a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor who is also a Certified Alcohol and Substance Prevention Specialist.

Online Alcohol Class

Court approved online classes for alcohol, drug and substance abuse
An alcohol, drug or substance addiction will eventually cause harm to you or to others. If you get into trouble with the law, then you may receive a judge or court order to attend drug and alcohol classes. The goals of an alcohol, drug or substance abuse class are to help you understand how the alcohol and/or drugs affect your body, and the harm that you may cause to others while abusing the substance. They also teach some self change skills to help you overcome your addictions and manage relapse episodes. Our classes will provide information about the short and long term affects of the substance abuse. These classes will also provide information regarding the financial and emotional costs of your addiction.

Click on class below to begin registration:


NEW!
OTHER ONLINE CLASSES at Tom Wilson Counseling Center:








ALL classes developed and monitored by Tom Wilson, a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor who is also a Certified Alcohol and Substance Prevention Specialist.

Alcohol Awareness Class

Multiple Genetic Factors May Be Cause of Alcohol Dependence

Recent studies suggest Alcoholism or Alcohol Dependence has several genetic factors instead of a single genetic risk factor.

More than 7,500 adult male and female twins were studied in the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders to determine the structure of genetic risk for Alcoholism

They found that three genetic factors reflect risk for (1) increased tolerance and heavy use, (2) loss of control with alcohol-associated social dysfunction, and (3) withdrawal and use despite problems.

Though these results are preliminary, authors state that they could influence future efforts to study genetic risk factors for Alcoholism. The authors note that previous studies “have looked at the magnitude of genetic factors assuming that a single dimension of genetic liability.”

They recommend reconsidering these earlier conclusions in light of the results of this study. This new study indicates that several genetic factors—not just one—influence risk for Alcoholism.

As a result, the study’s authors argue that the assumption of a single genetic risk factor “is unwarranted and should not continue to be accepted before being subjected to empirical test.”